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Academic Bridging Program Course Descriptions

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Services and Support

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Who Qualifies

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Current Student FAQs

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Application Procedures

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Full-time option

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Prospective Student FAQs

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Information Sessions & Testimonials

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Course & Schedule

WDW101Y1 – Canadian History

Description

This course provides a survey of Canada’s political, social, and economic history from European settlement to the near present by studying a range of topics including the history of Canada’s First Nations people, Anglophone-Francophone relations, relations with Great Britain and the United States, and the development of the various structures of modern Canada.

Through lectures and class discussions, students will develop a variety of essential university-level skills, such as how to read critically, analyze problems carefully, think independently, conduct historical research and write a variety of essays. By the end of the course, students will have gained a broad understanding of Canadian history and the skills necessary to pursue university work.

Requirements

This course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The required readings include standard history texts and research materials, Students are also requires to write a variety of essays both in and out of class, including a two-hour mid-term, and a three-hour final examinations. Exclusion: JWH100Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in the Humanities or Social Sciences program such as Anthropology, Cultural or Media studies, International Relations, Political Science, and History.

 

WDW102Y1 – Contemporary Canada

Description

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the changing nature of contemporary Canadian society by examining the historical roots of a variety of themes, such as aboriginal issues, regionalism, French-English relations, gender/women’s issues, and immigration/multiculturalism, which are examined in a variety of interdisciplinary sources, including geography, history, politics, literature, and culture.

Through an interactive course format consisting of lectures and class discussions, students are encourages to develop a variety of skills necessary to succeed in university, including how to read fiction and nonfiction critically and how to write a variety of essays . By the end of the course students should possess a broad understanding of Canadian society and sharpened analytical skills

Requirements

This Course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The required readings include a standard text, novels, and a set of online interdisciplinary readings. Students are also required to write a number of essays both in and out of class, including a two-hour mid-term test, and a three-hour final examination. Exclusion: JWU100Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in Humanity’s or Social Sciences programs such as Art, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology or interdisciplinary programs such as Canadian Studies or Woman Studies.

 

WDW103Y1 – Introduction to the Study of Literature

Description

In this course students will learn how to read critically, comprehend more fully, and analyze representative examples of outstanding literary work of drama, poetry, and fiction. They will also learn how to write more clearly and effectively, and how to use the library to do research. This is a Humanities course, and as such addresses major issues of the human condition – love and friendship, aging and death, the natural and social environment, heredity and free will.

The course format consists of lectures and class discussions. Students develop university-level writing and research skills through assignments written in and out of class.

Requirements

This course requires fluency in reading, writing, and speaking English. The course readings are balanced between classic and more modern works, and provide examples of important genres. Students are also required to write a variety of essays, including a two-hour mid-term, and a three-hour final examination. Exclusion: ENG185Y1

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be suitable for students who are considering further studies in a Humanities program such as comparative Literature, English, Philosophy, and Writing and Rhetoric.

 

WDW104Y1 – Introduction to Environmental Studies

Description

This interdisciplinary course introduces the major issues regarding the sustainability of the global environment in the face of human development by integrating humanities and social science with the fundamental concept of environmental sciences and focusing on a variety of themes, such as human development and health issues, environmental toxicology, solid and hazardous waste, air and water pollution, climate change, ethical concerns, food resources, renewable energy, conservation and sustainability.

Through the interactive course format of lectures and class discussions, students are taught a variety of university-level skills, such as how to read, think, and analyze critically, to conduct research and to write essays and multiple choice testes. By the end of the course students should possess a broad understanding of the many ways in which humans affect the environment as well as practical solutions for sustainable development.

Requirements

This course requires proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English. In addition to a variety of readings to be assigned, students are required to write a variety of reports, tests and essays, including a two-hour mid-term and a three hour final examination.

Recommendations

Though the specific Bridging course completed will not influence future program selections, this course may be of interest to students who are considering further studies in Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, Peace and Conflict Studies, Geography, History, Sociology, and Political Science. 

Student Life Programs and Services

Student Life Programs and Services are dedicated to enhancing the student experience by providing academic, health, and personal support services, and opportunities to participate in the campus and wider community. The following are some links to services and programs that fall under Student Life:

Accessibility Services

455 Spadina Avenue, 4th Floor, Suite 400

Toronto, Ontario M5S 2G8

Phone: 416 978 8060

Fax: 416 978 5729

Email: accessibility.services@utoronto.ca

Website: www.accessibility.utoronto.ca

Accessibility Services provides services and programs for students with a documented disability, be it physical, sensory, a learning disability, or a mental health disorder. Students with a temporary disability also qualify. Services include alternative test and exam arrangements, note-taking services, on-campus transportation, adaptive equipment and assistive devices, and skill development.

Students investigating academic accommodations are responsible for contacting Accessibility Services and providing up –to-date documentation as soon as possible, after admission to the Academic Bridging Program, to initiate appropriate support services.   

Fees and Financial Aid

Tuition Fees

The approximate cost of the part-time Academic Bridging Program in 2014/2015 was $1700. The full-time Academic Program was roughly $5000. Tuition is expected to rise by a small percentage for this coming session. This amount includes both the tuition cost for the course(s) ant the compulsory incidental fees which include all the resources and services available to U of T students. Students should also budget approximately $300-$400 for books and supplies for each course. Consideration towards additional costs related to transportation and childcare needs should also be taken. Academic Bridging Program students will receive an itemized fees invoice and payment instructions with their admission package.

Financial Aid

Noah Meltz Special Bursary Program (best option for part-time students)

The Noah Meltz Special Bursary Program is named in honour of the former Principal of Woodsworth College from 1991 to 1998. Part-time students with demonstrable financial need may be eligible for funds to help with academic costs such as tuition and books.

Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) (best option for full-time students)

OSAP offers a mix of grants and loans to Ontario residents to help pay for post-secondary education. Factors including course load, academic progress, family contributions, and residency will determine eligibility. Students in the full-time Academic Bridging Program are eligible to apply (part-time students with special circumstances may also qualify).

Students who have defaulted on previous student loans are not eligible for either Meltz or OSAP and are encouraged to remove themselves from the funding restriction list before applying to the Academic Bridging Program.

Woodsworth College Grants

Through the generosity of Professor William Waters and other donors, grants will be awarded on the basis of both financial need and academic progress to students registered in the Academic Bridging Program. More information will be made available to students once classes commence. 

Available Programs

Part-Time Academic Bridging Program

Applicants will enrol in ONE of the available part-time courses:

2015 Intensive Fall Session (September 14, 2015 to December 22, 2015)

Canadian History (WDW101Y1H) Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

2015/2016 Fall/Winter Session (September 14, 2015 to April 29, 2016)

Canadian History (WDW101Y1Y) Tuesday 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Introduction to the Study of Literature (WDW103Y1Y) Tuesday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Introduction to Environmental Studies (WDW104Y1Y) Wednesday 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Full-Time Academic Bridging Program

The full-time Academic Bridging stream is designed for those students who want or need more weekly classroom instruction during their Academic Bridging experience. Full-time students will be registered into the set full-time schedule opening avenues to specific financial aid/student loan opportunities available only to full-time students. Enrolment to the full-time program is limited. Interested applicants are encouraged to apply early.

2015/2016 Fall/Winter Full-Time Session (September 14, 2015 to April 29, 2016)

Introduction to Academic Studies (ABP100Y1Y) Tuesday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Contemporary Canada (WDW102Y1Y) Monday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Order and Disorder I and II (WDW151H1F and WDW152H1S) Wednesday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m

Occasional co-curricular activities may take place outside of the stated course times

This is the scheduled in-class lecture hours only. Students are expected to dedicate a considerable amount of hours per week outside of the classroom to review lecture material; read assigned texts; attend Writing Centre appointments; and to complete other assignments.

All courses will be held on the St. George Campus (Downtown Toronto) sessional dates are inclusive of the examination period 

Woodsworth College reserves the right to cancel courses if there is insufficient enrolment. 

Admission Requirements

To qualify for the 2015/2016 Academic Bridging Program, applicants must meet the following requirements:

1. Must be at least 19 years of age by October 1, 2015

2. Be either a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident
(Convention Refugees should contact the Academic Bridging Program)

3. Have been away from formal, full-time education for some time and; 

i) have NOT attempted degree level academic work (or equivalent) at a post-secondary institution such as a university or polytechnic institute.

ii) have NOT completed more than two years of full-time studies in a College of Applied Arts and Technology (or equivalent).

Potential applicants who do not meet requirements i) or ii) should contact the Academic Bridging Program by email to discuss their circumstances.

Applicants under the age of 23 must also NOT have completed four or more Ontario 12 U/M courses (or equivalent) within two years of the start of the Academic Bridging Program Session.

Applicants under the age of 20 must also NOT have registered in a secondary school or taken secondary school courses (or equivalent) within the two years of the start of the Academic Bridging Program Session.

Meeting the minimum admissions requirements does not guarantee registration with the Academic Bridging Program. Applications are reviewed on an individual basis to assess the academic readiness of each student. By accepting admission to the Academic Bridging Program, students with previous post-secondary studies will forfeit any possible transfer credits.

Returning Pre-University or Academic Bridging Program Students who did not successfully complete the course, should contact the Academic Bridging Office to discuss readmission.

 

Alternate Access Programs at the University of Toronto:

Diploma to Degree Program             

Transitional Year Programme

University of Toronto Mississauga Bridging Pathway

Is the Academic Bridging Program right for you?

There are many reasons to consider returning to school; to sharpen your academic skills, broaden your career options, pursue personal interests, or to just have the experience of university life. Numerous opportunities are available to achieve your academic goals, so take some time to research all your options to determine if the Academic Bridging Program is right for you. Potential applications are encouraged to attend an Information Session or to contact the Academic Bridging Program Office to discuss their specific academic goals.

How Does the Academic Bridging Program Work?

Successful students in the Academic Bridging Program are guaranteed admission to the Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto to continue studies towards an Honours Bachelor of Arts (Humanities and Social Sciences) with retained credit(s) towards their degree. A minimum final grade of 63% is necessary to continue in part-time degree studies, and 73% is required if the student wishes to study at a full-time basis.

Advantages of the Academic Bridging Program:

  • Small class sizes allow students to receive more individual feedback on academic work
  • Instructors, staff, and advisors sensitive to the academic needs of mature students
  • Resources and services available outside of classroom hours offer additional academic support, such as: the Academic Writing Centre, an on-site Learning Strategist, and intensive Study Skill Seminars
  • Access to all campus services covered by the incidental fee including: access to multiple study spaces and computers labs, Accessibility Services, Health Services, the Career Centre, Family Care Office, multiple athletic facilities, counselling services, and all the University of Toronto Libraries 

Program Overview

The Academic Bridging Program offers an opportunity for individuals who do not meet the typical admission requirements to qualify for admission to the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto. The Program provides a pathway from a student’s previous education and helps students prepare to meet the requirements of first year university courses in Humanities and Social Sciences.

Students in the program are introduced to the academic expectations of a university instructor and the workload of first year courses. Financial assistance is available to eligible students to meet some or all of the costs of the program. The Academic Bridging Program provides a welcoming, supportive, and diverse environment where students are encouraged to develop their study skills and academic confidence. Woodsworth College is a unique part of the University of Toronto, offering student-centred support and services to provide students with a welcoming atmosphere.

Program Learning Objectives

Develop Academic Skills:

  • students learn clear, mature, and reflective spoken and written communication
  • students learn critical analytical reading, thinking, and writing
  • students learn basic information literacy and good academic work habits and study skills

Understand University Culture:

  • students Learn appropriate classroom technology
  • students learn to use classroom technology
  • students learn to access university resources

Enhance Life Skills:

  • students learn to assess their personal and academic strengths and weaknesses, and readiness for university
  • students learn to develop an appreciation of lifelong learning in and out of the classroom
  • students learn to think and act independently and responsibly 

Thanks for visiting the Academic Bridging Program.

Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program
Woodsworth College, University of Toronto                      

119 St. George Street, Room 220                                                          
Toronto Ontario
M5S 1A9                                      

Phone: 416-978-4444
Fax: 416-978-4088
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Office Hours
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday  10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday  10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Friday  10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

 Note: the office closes 30 minutes earlier during the months of July and August

 

Frequently Asked Questions from Current Bridging Students

 
Something has come up—how do I withdraw from the Academic Bridging Program?
Notify the Bridging Office in writing by email, mail, fax, or in person before the appropriate deadline date.  Any fee consideration, will be strictly based on the refund and withdrawal schedule.  Students who walk away from the program but do not cancel their course in writing by the appropriate deadline will receive a failing grade.

When should I pay my fees?
The deadline for fee payments and the fee refund schedule is included in the admission package.  Tuition payments can be made through phone or online banking, and in person at a bank with the University of Toronto fees invoice.  More information regarding tuition fee payments can be found at: www.fees.utoronto.ca.

I have paid the minimum amount to register.  When is the remaining balance due?
Students who do not pay their full tuition fee will be charged a 1.5% monthly service charge on the balance of their account.  The service charges are applied, and will continue to accumulate on the 15th of each month (beginning November 15th for the Fall session), until the balance is cleared.  Any remaining balance on the account must be paid by the end of the course.

I have received notification that I will be granted the Noah Meltz Bursary.  What do I need to do to claim this bursary?
The Noah Meltz bursary are automatically credited to the student’s account and excess funds, if any, are issued to students as a cheque in the mail.  Students are responsible to check their accounts on ROSI to ensure that fees have been paid.

I missed a class/in-class test/deadline for an assignment.  What should I do?
Students should try to attend every class for their academic success.  Students should contact their instructor as soon as possible to discuss missed assignment, required readings, and other course related material.  It is a good idea for students to connect with fellow classmates to get the missed lecture notes.  Students may need to submit documentation to support the reason for the absence or missed deadline.

Are there any academic support programs available with my course?
The Woodsworth Academic Writing Centre provides one-on-one guidance to students to improve writing skills.  Academic Bridging students can also meet with a Learning Strategist and attend the Academic Skills seminars, which provide strategies to develop the skills necessary for academic success.  Academic support is also available through Academic Success Centre at the Koffler Student centre (www.asc.utoronto.ca).

As an Academic Bridging student, what U of T services can I use?
Students can utilise the athletic facilities, libraries, Family Care Office, Career Centre, and Health Services, to name a few.  These services are covered by your incidental fees, which also include limited health and dental insurance coverage (Fall and Winter sessions only).  Please contact the Association of Part-time Undergraduate Students (www.apus.utoronto.ca) or the University of Toronto Student Union for full-time students (www.utsu.ca) for more information regarding the health and dental plan (a PDF copy of the part-time GreenShield Benefit Booklet is available for printing above).

I want to speak with an academic advisor.  How do I make an appointment?
The Bridging Office offers drop-in appointments on most Tuesdays from 10:00 a.m. to noon and 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Students who cannot meet on Tuesday afternoons can also book an appointment by contacting the Academic Bridging Office. 

Where can I get an application for the Woodsworth College bursary?
Applications for the Woodsworth College, William Waters’ bursary are available on Blackboard halfway through the course.  The average amount of the bursary is $300 to $600 so students with demonstrated financial need should apply first for the Meltz bursary when they are admitted to the Academic Bridging Program.

 

To pursue degree studies at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Arts and Science, students:
must be a resident of the province of Ontario for at least 12 months;
must have successfully completed one Academic Bridging course, with a minimum final standing of 63% for part-time studies or 73% for full-time studies.

Some programs in the Faculty of Arts and Science have additional Ontario Grade 12 university preparation subject requirements.  For recommendations on how to upgrade prerequisite courses, click on the PDF link to the right of the page.
________________________________________________________________________


Frequently Asked Questions from Students Graduating from Academic Bridging

 

When and how will I receive my final mark?
Final grades are posted on ROSI www.rosi.utoronto.ca typically 3 to 5 weeks after the examination.  To login, students will need their student number and a PIN.  If you have not used ROSI, your PIN will be your six-digit date of birth (YYMMDD).

Do I need to submit an admission application to continue studies in Humanities and Social Sciences after Bridging?
No, students who successfully complete the Program with at least 63% will be admitted automatically by Bridging, to the University of Toronto, Faculty of Arts and Science, as a Humanities and Social Science student for the following September session.

What if I am interested in an studying in a program outside of the Humanities and Social Science stream, or with another Campus or Faculty?
Students interested in programs outside of Humanities and Social Sciences (including Economics, Forest Conservation, Public Policy, Commerce, Sciences, and Computer Science) or those wanting to continue studies at UTSC or UTM, will need to submit an Other Degree Consideration form to the program office before the end of classes.  These programs will most likely will require the completion of additional Ontario grade 12/4U subject requirements. 

Academic Bridging will not qualify students for admission to other Faculties at U of T such as Architecture, Engineering, Music, Architecture, or Kinesiology and Physical Education.  Students will need to submit a separate application to the Admission Office (www.adm.utoronto.ca/adm) for these Faculties; admission is very competitive and requires top grades. 

I have my final grade; what is the next step to select courses for September?
Students who achieved a mark of 63% or higher will have successfully completed the Program and will automatically receive their admission package in June or July with instructions regarding course registration.  First-year information sessions are offered to guide students through the registration process; attendance is not mandatory, but students find these sessions extremely helpful with their program planning.

I did not receive the required grade for admission to the University of Toronto.  What options are available to me?
Students who received a mark between 50% and 62% are advised to contact the Bridging Office to discuss their academic options.  Students who receive a mark of less than 50% unfortunately have failed the course and are unable to reapply to the Bridging Program.

Can I take courses in the immediate summer session?
Due to time constraints and space availability, summer course options are limited.  Students interested in taking summer courses should review the summer timetable online and contact the Academic Bridging office for information on registration timelines.

What if I do not want to start my degree studies immediately?
Students who decide to take a break from academia can resume their studies in the Faculty of Arts and Science, with Woodworth College, in a future session.  Upon returning at a later date, students will need to complete a “Request for Reactivation” form and pay a reaction fee (currently $25) at the Registrar’s office.

How do I get a transcript for my Academic Bridging/Pre-University course?
Transcripts for Academic Bridging courses can be ordered through ROSI at www.rosi.utoronto.ca or by providing the request in writing to the Faculty of Arts and Science Transcript Office at www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/undergraduate/transcripts.

Students who were registered with the University of Toronto Pre-University Program, the mature student program prior to the year 2000, can obtain a transcript for their Pre-University course by returning the completed PreU transcript request form to the Academic Bridging Office, or by providing the request in writing to the Bridging Office by email or fax. There is a CDN $10.00 for each transcript ordered.

Where can I find more information about bursaries, scholarships, and the student services available at Woodsworth College?
Information regarding financial aid and academic sessions are available on the Current Students page through the main Woodsworth website.  For a summary of the student services at Woodsworth, please visit the Student Services link also found on the Woodsworth website at www.wdw.utoronto.ca/index.php/current_students.

What is the Academic Bridging Mentorship Program and how do I apply?
The Academic Bridging Mentorship Program matches Bridging Alumni who are eager and willing to share their personal experiences, with individuals rolling over from Academic Bridging to full or part time studies at the University of Toronto. This program focuses on creating meaningful one-on-one relationships, which will be supplemented by intermittent seminars, and events. For more information, please visit the Academic Bridging Connections website. 

Please review the 2014-2015 Bridging handbook (click here) in detail before submitting an application.

New admission and book scholarships available to part-time students. 

Application Deadlines

2015 Fall Session: Coming Soon

2016 Winter Session: TBA

2015 Summer Session:  TBA

Applications will be processed on a "first complete, first-serve" basis.

More instructions will be provided at the conclusion of the online application regarding the $95.00 application fee payment.


 

How to Apply


1) Complete and sumbit the online application form.
All parts of the form must be completed; if any sections of the application are left blank, the application will not be processed. Include documentation in support of your status in Canada and study permit if applicable.

2) Pay the $95 non-refundable application fee.
By cash, debit, credit card, certified cheque or money order (payable in Canadian funds to the University of Toronto). Unfortunately at this time we do not accept online payments; we do accept faxed credit card (AMEX, MasterCard or VISA) authorization.

3) Provide acdemic transcripts of secondary schools and any post-secondary institution previously attended, regardless of whether or not studies were completed.
Official transcripts of post-secondary studies in Canada or abroad must be mailed directly from the issuing institutions to the Academic Bridging Office, or delivered to the office in the original sealed/stamped envelope from the issuing institution. 

Unofficial copies of secondary school transcripts are acceptable and can be faxed or emailed directly to the Bridging Office.
If the name on the application does not match the name on the transcripts, proof of legal name change is required.

4) Attach a copy of the Academic Readiness Checklis with your responses.
Students are not required to answer "Yes" to all the points for the purpose of admissions.  We encourage students to provide accurate responses so that we can recommend addtional information or support services if appropriate.

5) Submit a one-page writing sample in support of your academic readiness.
Write a brief letter demonstrating potential for success through your academic and non-academic experiences and accomplishments. Elaborate in four paragraphs on:
a) your specific educational/career goals and why Bridging (rather than another access program) is most suitable;
b) what steps you have taken to prepare yourself for the academic and scheduling demands of the course;
c) if you will be applying for financial aid; and how you plan to manage the financial costs and fees associated with the program if financial aid is not available;
d) the sections of the Academic Readiness Checklist that you anticipate will be the most challenging for you during the program and how you plan to manage the challenges.

 

Note: Omitting previous studies from the application is considered an academic offense and can result in students being withdrawn from the University of Toronto at any time during their course of studies.

 

All documents and transcripts received by the Academic Bridging Program become the property of the University of Toronto; originals and/or copies will not be returned to the applicant or forwarded to other institutions. We reserve the right to confidentially shred duplicate copies of documents.  The university is required to report student-level enrolment-related data to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities as a condition of its receipt of operating grant funding.  The Ministry collects this enrolment data, which includes limited personal information such as Ontario Education Numbers, student characteristics and educational outcomes, in order to administer government postsecondary funding, policies and programs, including planning, valuation and monitoring activities.

 

 

 

The Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program will be offering the full-time program for the 2015 Fall session! 

The full-time Bridging stream is designed for those students who want or need more weekly classroom instruction during their Bridging experience.  Full-time Bridging students will be registered in the courses listed below, opening avenues to specific financial aid/student loan opportunities only available to full-time students.  Enrollment to the full time program is limited to only the Fall session as classes begin in September.

Full-Time Course Descriptions

ABP100Y1 – Introduction to Academic Studies

This interdisciplinary, skills-focused course parallels the other component courses of the full-time Academic Bridging Program supplementing those courses while providing intensive, workshop-style training in the fundamental skills needed to for success in the program in the further university studies. The course will focus on the texts studies in both Contemporary Canada and Order and Disorder I and II and a substantial amount of class time will be devoted to preparing for and writing the term assignments for those courses and helping students integrate their entire Academic Bridging experience.

WDW102Y1 – Contemporary Canada

Description

This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to the changing nature of contemporary Canadian society by examining the historical roots of a variety of themes, such as aboriginal issues, regionalism, French-English relations, gender/women’s issues, and immigration/multiculturalism, which are examined in a variety of interdisciplinary sources, including geography, history, politics, literature, and culture.

Through an interactive course format consisting of lectures and class discussions, students are encourages to develop a variety of skills necessary to succeed in university, including how to read fiction and nonfiction critically and how to write a variety of essays . By the end of the course students should possess a broad understanding of Canadian society and sharpened analytical skills.

WDW151H1 - Order and Disorder I: Issues and Perspectives

Societies require law and order, but at what point does order become oppression? How do we balance our need for freedom and society’s need for order? This interdisciplinary seminar allows students to explore these and related questions through selected readings introducing theories from sociology, political science, philosophy, and history.

WDW152H1 – Order and Disorder II: Problems and Solutions

Building on the questions and theoretical perspectives discussed in WDW151H1, this interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to some of the methods used by scholars and researchers in sociology, political science, philosophy, and history to develop, test, and debate possible solutions to the problems of social order and disorder. 

Frequently Asked Questions from Students applying to the Academic Bridging Program

 

How do I apply to the Academic Bridging Program?
Students may complete the online application form and submit the $95.00 application fee by mail, fax, or in person.  Applications received without all supporting documentation will be held in queue but are considered incomplete without the $95 application fee, transcripts, and academic readiness letter.  Review the handbook thoroughly before submitting an application. 

What methods of payment do you accept for the $95 application fee?
The $95 application fee can be paid by debit (in person only), credit card (AMEX, VISA, or MasterCard), or certified cheque/money order (payable in Canadian funds to the University of Toronto).  Applications submitted online or by fax must include the credit card payment authorization (see portable documents).

How much will the Academic Bridging Program cost?
The approximate cost for Academic Bridging in 2013-2014 was over $1600 for the part-time option; the full-time option will be over $5000.  Students should plan for an additional $300 to $400 for textbooks and supplies per course, and also budget for childcare and transportation costs if applicable.

Can I apply to Bridging if I am an international student?
Applicants must have status in Canada as a Citizen, Permanent Resident, or Convention Refugee (with valid study permit). This program is not apporpriate for international students. Students with a Canadian study visa should contact the Bridging Office to discuss other program options.

Is the Academic Bridging Program part-time or full-time?
The majority of students in the Bridging Program are registered in only one course which makes the program part-time.  One full-time option is available in the Fall session.  See the Bridging brochure for more information.  Classes beginning in the Fall session are held once per week; Spring and Summer session classes are held twice per week.

Is OSAP available for Academic Bridging Students?
Bridging students in the full-time option may apply for OSAP.  Students taking the part-time option cannot apply for full-time OSAP but in some special circumstances, may be eligible for part-time OSAP.  Academic Bridging students in the part-time option are encouraged to apply for part-time financial aid programs such as the Noah Meltz grant.  For more information regarding part-time financial aid options, visit the U of T awards page at www.adm.utoronto.ca

Will I get credit for the course?
Students who successfully complete the Academic Bridging program will retain full credit(s) towards their undergraduate degree in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

What programs are available after completing the Academic Bridging Program and what should I do if I am interested in a program such as Ecomonics or Sciences (including Psychology) that requires additional prerequisites?
Students successful with Academic Bridging are admitted to the University of Toronto (St. George Campus) in the Humanities and Social Science stream.  The Bridging Program by itself will not be sufficient for students interested in programs such as Sciences or Economics, or for students considering admissions to other faculties at the University which will require additional grade 12/4U math and/or science courses completed with good grades.  Students should discuss suitability of the Bridging Program with an Admissions Officer before they apply. 

How do I know if I am ready for the Bridging Program? Is there a test I can take to tell me if I am likely to do well in the course?
The Bridging program itself is essentially the “challenge” to determine a student’s ability to do well in degree studies. Students are encouraged to review the Academic Readiness Checklist and research all available options that will help them reach their academic goals before they make this important decision.  Students are encouraged to contact the Office and discuss any concerns they have with an academic advisor.

Visit the Council of Educators of Toronto website at www.postsecondaryispossible.com to search a database of access & outreach programs, scholarships and resources across all of Toronto's colleges, universities and school boards!

 

 

Interested in learning more about the Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program and subsequent degree studies at the University of Toronto?  Attend an Information Session at Woodsworth College on any of the dates listed below.

Registration is required due to limited seating.  Email academic.bridging@utoronto.ca to confirm a date.

Please arrive on time as the 60 minute sessions will begin promptly at the times indicated.

RECORDING OF VIDEO OR PHOTO IMAGES AT THE SESSIONS ARE STRICTLY PROHIBITED.  Please be courteous and have your cell phones turned off or set to the silent mode before entering the room.  Presenations are displayed on the projector screen; please contact the Bridging office at least two days in advance if accommodations are required.

Fall 2015 Information Sessions will be announced shortly

 
 
 
All Sessions will take place at Woodsworth College (119 St. George Street), Room 123

 

 

NEW -- VOX online! 

VOX is a collection of essays written by Woodsworth students.  Check out the featured essays written by Bridging graduates!

The Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program offers an opportunity for individuals who are at least 19 years of age to pursue degree studies at the University of Toronto.

Academic Bridging is designed for individuals who have been away from formal education for some time and do not meet the University’s established requirements for direct entry admission; the course is intended to bridge the gap between a student’s prior education and the requirements of first year university courses in Humanities and Social Sciences.  Students who successfully complete the Academic Bridging Program are admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science, at the University of Toronto, with retained credit(s) towards their degree.

Information on the upcoming 2015/2016 Fall/Winter Session is now available on the website. Simply navigate thought the side tabs for more information.

The deadline for applications is fast approaching. Complete your application soon to avoid disappointment. 

 


 

 

Millie Rotman Shime

The Academic Bridging Program is named in honour of Millie Rotman Shime, a University of Toronto graduate and Toronto secondary school teacher of History and English, whose life exemplified the best that any great university may expect of its alumni.  Her father, the late Manny Rotman, who received his Bachelor’s Degree from Woodsworth College in 1985 at age 76, wished to commemorate Millie’s memory by helping others who shared her passion for learning.  Beginning as the Pre-University Program for mature students in 1967, it was updated and renamed the Academic Bridging Program in 2000 with the generous support of the Rotman family.

Take the Virtual Tour

For the 2015 Fall Session of the Academic Bridging Program information coming soon. 

Please check back in May for more information. 

 

Course Schedule

Fall 2015:  September 2015 to April 16 (1 class per week)
Examination Date:  To be annouced (will take place during the examination period; April 2016)*

*Please note:  The final examination may be scheduled on any date and time during the examination period. Students taking a day course may be required to write an evening examination, and students taking an evening course may be required to write an examination during the day. Students who make personal commitments during the examination period do so at their own risk. No special consideration is given and no special arrangements are made in the event of conflicts.

Canadian History - WDW101Y1 (formerly JWH100Y1)

 

Contemporary Canada - WDW102Y1 (formerly JWU100Y1)

 

Introduction to the Study of Literature - WDW103Y1 (formerly ENG185Y1)

 

 

 

[This page will be removed after the start of classes so you may wish to print a copy of the information and add it to the Bridging Handbook for your reference]

 

Cancellations
Woodsworth College reserves the right to cancel courses if there is insufficient enrollment.