Math Aid Centre

Special Events

199 Seminars

First Year Options

WDW FLC

Other 199

Computer Resources

Registrarial Services

Central Services (St. George Campus)

Academic Writing Centre

Academic Skills Support

Student Services and Academic Support

Scholarships and Awards

Financial Aid

Fees

Residence

Financial Matters

New Students

Welcome to Woodsworth College! We encourage you to access the guidance and support available to you as your begin your transition to university studies.

 

Get Ready!

  1. Check out the information provided by the Faculty of Arts and Science at Welcome New Students.
     
  2. Attend a Welcome Event at Woodsworth College on May 31, June 6, June 14.
     
  3. Review the Calendar and Registration Instructions and Timetable online.
     
  4. Attend an Academic Orientation Session and meet our academic advisors.
     
  5. Choose your  courses and plan out a timetable.
     
  6. Verify your course enrolment start date/time on ROSI.
     
  7. Make sure you pay or defer your tuition fees by August 19 th .
     
  8. Get your U of T student card (T-Card) and set up your U of T email account.
     
  9. After you have attended an Academic Orientation Session, if you have last minute questions, take advantage of our Drop-in Counselling. Academic advisors will be available to see new students in the Registrar’s Office (Room 220) in July and August.
    Tuesdays  10:00 – 12 Noon and 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
    Thursdays   2:00 – 4:00 p.m
  10. If you have questions feel free to contact us at wdwregistrar@utoronto.ca

Get Oriented!

Woodsworth College Orientation has something for everyone. The Woodsworth College Students' Association Orientation Management Committee will be working hard this summer to develop a week of fun and informative events and activities to help you make a smooth transition to university.

Be sure to register for Orientation as soon as possible as space for some events is limited. For more information and the registration form please go to the orientation website: www.woodsworthfrosh.com.

Overview

Whether a full-time or part-time student, financial planning is an important component of assuring academic success at university. Students are encouraged to examine their entire financial picture carefully and to plan their studies accordingly. There are many ways to tap into additional financial resources while studying at Woodsworth College. Do not hesitate to make an appointment to see the Awards Officer. Contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to discuss your financial plan.

Each year, Woodsworth College provides over $1 million in financial support through grants and scholarships to its students. Woodsworth College grants are awarded to students based on financial need. Grants provide modest assistance to students who have explored all other avenues of financial assistance (e.g. work, family support, OSAP, UTAPS, Noah Meltz Grant) and still have financial need.

Woodsworth College Scholarships are awarded based on academic merit. The flagship Peter F. Bronfman Scholarship Fund provides a $10,000 award to a graduating student who excels academically and has contributed to the university and the larger community. Additionally, Woodsworth College has many admission, in-course and graduation scholarships.

The Woodsworth College Residence houses full-time undergraduate students at the corner of Bloor and St. George Streets. Designed by the award-winning architectsalliance, the Woodsworth College Residence features a four-story podium plus a shimmering 13-storey glass tower, designed to fill all the rooms with natural light and providing an inspiring addition to the downtown streetscape.

Students live in air-conditioned, suite-style apartments with private, single bedrooms. Each suite houses four to six residents, with two bathrooms, a shared kitchen and living area. There are laundry facilities on the ground floor, plus 24-hour security, high-speed internet access, common areas and a Residence Life Program of social events, student government, educational programming and counselling - all included in a residence that is just steps away from libraries, lecture halls and athletic facilities. The Woodsworth residence features an enclosed courtyard and a multi-purpose room on the main floor. These areas provide space for resident and non-resident students to mingle and meet.

Fee Payment Deadline: August 19, 2014

How and when to pay your fees

To be automatically registered for the fall-winter session you must enrol in courses AND pay at least the minimum first installment of your fees (or officially defer them) by August 19.

If your payment has not been received or officially deferred by August 19, you will be removed from your courses.

IMPORTANT: Students on waiting lists will be added to the course when space is made available at any time. You may not be able to be reinstated to a course that you have been removed from because students on waiting lists may have filled the space created.

Deferring your fees

If you have been approved for OSAP and aren’t able to pay the minimum payment before you receive your OSAP loan you may be eligible to defer your fees before AUGUST 19h. To defer your fees on ROSI, click the Financial Account tab. The deferral button near the bottom of the page.

If you defer all or part of your fees, service charge will be assessed on your outstanding account balance beginning November 15th and on the 15th of every month thereafter until the account is paid in full.

Tuition Refunds

The deadline to receive a tuition refund can be found on the Student Accounts website under “refund schedule”.  Don’t confuse the dates to drop courses for a tuition refund and the dates to drop courses without academic penalty!

Outstanding Tuition Balance

If you have a balance remaining in your student account it must be cleared before you can register in any subsequent session.

Financial Aid

For most full-time, undergraduate students at Woodsworth College, the first avenue of financial assistance is through the federal and provincial (ie OSAP) loan program.  Eligible students must maintain a course load of at least 60% in each term to qualify for federal/provincial funding.

Woodsworth College Bursaries and Grants

The College has an extensive bursary and grant program.  Students are encouraged to apply when applications become available October 1 for the Fall/Winter Session and the first week of classes in the summer session.  Most students applying for a bursary will have already applied for other funding. However, students are encouraged to meet with the College’s financial advisor to discuss their individual circumstances.

UTAPS

Students who receive provincial loans may be eligible for a UTAPS grant. University of Toronto Advance Planning for Students (UTAPS) is a financial aid program for students who are assessed by OSAP as requiring maximum assistance, and whose assessed need is not fully covered by government aid. U of T will ensure that this need is met. Students who receive loans from provinces other than Ontario are required to submit an UTAPS application.

Financial Aid for Part-time Students

Depending on their course load, part-time students can apply for the Noah Meltz Grant, a grant offered though the University of Toronto to assist part-time degree students with their educational costs, or part time OSAP. The application for the Noah Meltz grant and information about Part time OSAP can be found on the Enrolment Services website.

OSAP Repayment

If you have been financing your education with Canada or Ontario student loans (OSAP) you should consider a repayment plan. Your first payment is due in the seventh month after you cease to be a full-time student. This is your “Consolidation Date”. While you are a full-time student (i.e., 60% course load or greater), the Federal and Provincial governments pay the interest on your student loans. You are responsible for arranging repayment with your lender(s) before your six-month period expires by signing a Consolidation Agreement/Loan Repayment form. This will specify your monthly payments, the term and the interest rate. For detailed information go to this site.

 

Woodsworth College distributes over $135,000 in scholarship awards each year. The majority are in-course scholarships, awarded to students who have achieved academic excellence. Woodsworth College is grateful to the Students Association, the Alumni Association, and the many private and corporate donors whose active support adds so much to the quality of student life at the College.

Woodsworth also has a limited number of admissions scholarships, including the William Waters Commerce Awards made available each year to our most promising new students.

Upon graduating from the University of Toronto and Woodsworth College there are also graduation scholarships available. These recognize academic excellence.

Woodworth College also recognizes academic excellence in the form of scholarships for graduates of the Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging program. Graduates of the program who continue degree studies through Woodsworth College are eligible for these awards.

Woodsworth sponsors scholarships and awards for those studying abroad through the Summer Abroad Programs.

Woodsworth College takes pride in the excellent academic support services it offers its students. The Office of the Registrar is open to serve the students on a daily basis.  The academic advisors offer front-line, drop-in and scheduled counselling appointments.  They assist students in formulating academic and financial plans to support their success.

The College’s excellent Academic Writing Centre assists each student with all aspects of the writing process. Students can arrange a 45-minute, one-on-one appointment with a writing tutor to help them polish their writing style. 

The Woodsworth/Rotman computer lab is equipped with 36 PC workstations and is staffed by lab monitors at all times. As a U of T student, each student has access to the University of Toronto Library and current versions of MS Office software and Internet Explorer. Training courses are offered in September in word processing skills required for essay and report writing, and for creating personal web pages.

For new students this August: Jump Start—Secrets of Survival and Success at U of T [pdf]

Specially designed for incoming First-Year students, our Jump Start program is an intensive, one-day introduction to all the skills you need in order to get the most out of your U of T experience, featuring workshops and individual consultations with experts from the Woodsworth College Academic Writing Centre and presentations by experienced senior students.  Topics include:

  • Adjusting to university-level expectations
  • Accessing College and U of T resources and services
  • Staying on top of term work
  • Balancing studies and personal time
  • Doing Library research
  • Tackling essays, reports, and other university assignments
  • Preparing for tests and exams
  • And more…

Jump Start is free, but spaces are limited, so we ask that you register online.  Lunch is included.  Sign up for one of the three sessions:

  • Saturday August 10,  9 to 5, WW126
  • Saturday August 17, 9 to 5, WW126
  • Saturday August 24, 9 to 5, WW126

 

Please note that Jump Start is NOT intended for students entering the Academic Bridging Program; academic skills workshops designed for the particular needs of Bridging students are offered during the regular term.


Starting in September: Writing Plus

Academic skills workshops for students in all years are offered at various times on weekdays and Saturdays throughout the Fall and Winter sessions in the Writing Plus series. For detailed information on workshop topics, dates, times, and locations, visit the main Writing Plus site.

To book an appointment, you must login to our online booking system using your utorID. If no appointments are available, you can try for a drop-in anytime the Centre is open. Click here to login.

The Academic Writing Centre, located in Room 214 in the new wing of the College, offers one-on-one help with all aspects of academic writing. You can come in at any stage of the writing process, from the starting point through to the final draft, and you can bring the same paper in for several appointments if necessary.  In a 45-minute session an experienced tutor will read your work-in- progress and help you understand the topic, develop an effective thesis, organize a strong argument, document your sources correctly, and improve your grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation.

We can also work with you on time management, lecture-listening and note- taking, studying and test-taking strategies, or any other academic skills that you want to improve.

Current hours of operation:
Monday to Thursday: 10 AM to 7 PM
Friday: 10 AM to 4 PM
Saturday: 1 to 4 PM

The University of Toronto has an impressive array of services to assist and support its students. For a complete list of programs and services please visit the Student Life Programs and Services website. [Link]

You should be aware of the following services:

Academic Success Centre
The Academic Success Centre provides lectures and workshops to help students develop skills, strategies and competencies to meet students' academic needs and personal learning style. Individual and drop-in consultations are available as well as online services.

Accessibility Services
Accessibility Services provides accommodation for students with disabilities to that they can reach their academic potential. Services are provided to students with a documented disability or temporary/long-term health condition.

The Athletic Centre
The Athletic Centre is an expansive multi-story, multi-use health and fitness facility that is conveniently located at 55 Harbord Street on U of T’s downtown campus.  Members of the Athletic Centre also enjoy access to the state-of-the-art facilities at the new Varsity Centre, located just steps away at 299 Bloor Street West.  All U of T students are automatically members of the Athletic Centre and Varsity Centre.

Career Centre
The Career Centre provides counseling, workshops and services to assist you in planning for your career.  In addition they can help you prepare a resume and search for part-time or summer employment.

Centre for International Experience
The Centre for International Experience offers lounges and meeting rooms for students and some student groups. Specialized services for international students are available as well as a Work and Study Abroad Resource Centre for Canadian students. Also offered are events and activities for students with cross-cultural interests.

Counselling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Counselling & Psychological Services (CAPS) provides students with short-term individual counselling: assessment, treatment and referrals for a wide range of emotional and psychological problems.

Family Care Office
The Family Care Office offers guidance, information, referrals and advocacy on child care, elder care, and programs in the community for families. Workshops and discussion groups on child care, parenting, and elder care are available. There is also a Resource Centre containing practical material on family issues ranging from pregnancy and infant care to lesbian and gay parenting and caring for elderly family members.

First Nations House
First Nations House offers academic and financial aid counselling, Elders in Residence, cultural programmes, recreational activities, a library and computer centre. The House provides a forum for all U of T students and Aboriginal community members to share a meal, visit with one of the Elders or access resources on Native issues. The Native Student Association, housed on the fourth floor, offers cultural support, peer tutoring, mentoring and social events.

Hart House
It is a great place on campus to get involved in student clubs, exercise, be creative, relax, eat and meet other students.  Please visit the website for a full listing of everything that is available. 

Health Services
Health Services offers a wide range of services for U of T students and their partners. Physician services include comprehensive medical care, counselling and referrals. Nurses provide information and a range of services including dressing care, immunizations and travel health education. Comprehensive sexual health assessment, care and counselling is available, including contraception counselling, education, prescriptions and products. Health Service is a designated Health Canada Travel Medicine Clinic and offers a complete travel immunization and education program for students. Diagnostic lab facilities are also available.

Housing Service
The Student Housing Service provides residence information, a registry of off-campus housing, information on landlord and tenant rights, emergency housing referrals, and functions as the admissions and community development office for student family.

Academic Advising

The Registrar’s Office is your reliable first stop for help and advice in all aspects of your university studies. Front-line advisors are able to assist you in understanding and interpreting the rules and regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Science and/or refer you to the appropriate services. To plan your academic programs or progress you can make a one-on-one in person or telephone appointment with an academic advisor. 

We understand that financial issues often impact on your studies; therefore, we provide financial advice and assistance. We encourage you to contact us!

Drop-In Counselling:
Tuesday:    10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Financial Counselling

We understand that financial issues often impact on your studies; therefore, financial planning is an important component of assuring academic success at university. Students are encouraged to examine their entire financial picture carefully and to plan their studies accordingly. Woodworth College provides financial advice and assistance.

Sole Support Parents

The Woodsworth College Single Parent group meets every other Wednesday for lunch throughout the winter and summer sessions. The group’s aim is to assist single parents in gaining the skills to balance the challenges at school and at home. There are special workshops, information about the university, financial management, sharing of experiences and mutual support. For more information email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

 

Computer Lab
The joint Woodworth/Commerce computer facility has a computerized reservation system. The lab is equipped with 36 Dell PCs. Current versions of MS Office (which includes Word, Excel and PowerPoint) and the latest versions of Netscape and Internet Explorer are available on each computer. The computer lab is also equipped with a scanner and graphic program for student use. Lab assistants are on hand at all times. The Lab is located in Room WW107. Call 416-978-0843 to reserve Lab time.

Hours of Operation: September 9, 2013 - April 30, 2014

Monday to Friday 10 - 10
Saturday 10 - 4
Sunday 12 - 4

 

Information Commons
The Computer Access Facility (CAF) is located on the first floor of Robarts Library and is available during regular Robarts Library hours. You will need your UTORid to access the workstations. There are 2 computers that do not require a UTORid login adjacent to the Infostation computers that provide access to the UTL Catalogue and to ROSI.

First Year Interdisciplinary Seminars

TBB - Thought, Belief and Behaviour
SII - Society and Its Institutions
XBC - Cross Breadth Category - Y course seminar that counts as half in each of two breadth categories

SII 199H1F Pacifists and Peaceniks: Canadian Peace Movements in Transnational Context  (L0331   R 10-12)
“Millions of people take to the streets of major cities around the globe to protest the Iraq war.”  “More than 35 cities and towns across Canada hold rallies to stop the war in Afghanistan.”  These and other headlines confirm that public pressure for world peace continues to be an important social movement, but the recent protests are only the latest stage in the evolution of an organized rejection of violence and war.  This course examines major peace movements since the early twentieth century with a special focus on the Canadian experience.  After a review of the religious and philosophical basis of pacifism as well as the historical development of secular peace movements, students will study a number of peace movements, past and present, in terms of such issues as religious and ideological commitment, gender composition and popular culture.  The course, taught in an interactive seminar format, will assist students in developing skills in academic research and writing, presentations and class discussions.  Where appropriate, films will be integrated with a variety of interdisciplinary readings.  Evaluation will be based on in-class tests, presentations, a major research essay and class participation.
Instructor: Dr. T. Socknat

TBB 199H1S Cultural Literacy in the Information Age (L0331 Tu 10-12)
Today’s university students increasingly rely on the Internet for online databases of full-text academic articles, free downloads from Google Books, digitized reproductions of works of art, etc., even though professors routinely warn about using online sources.  This course will examine the role of the Internet in university study.  First, we will use critical thinking and critical writing to improve access to and evaluation of Internet content.  Second, we will compare the Internet’s impact with the earlier “cultural literacy” revolution.  In the 1980s, E.D. Hirsch, Jr., argued that educational institutions must provide a broad learning base to equip students to participate in their culture.  His 1987 Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know introduced a new type of research tool.  What type of cultural literacy is needed in today’s Information Age?
Instructor:  Dr. T. Moritz

XBC199Y1Y   From Ray-Guns to Light Sabres: Science Fiction in Modern Culture (L0331 Th 1-3)
This course examines science fiction as a literary genre, a sociocultural phenomenon, and a media industry, with attention to its key themes (for example, future history, artificial intelligence, the alien, and the hero), key works (including classic texts, such as Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy, and contemporary favourites, such as George Lucas's Star Wars films), and ongoing debates about its place in contemporary culture (Does science fiction have relevance for all of society because it addresses vital issues, or is it essentially escapist entertainment serving a niche audience?). The course will emphasize both prose science fiction and science fiction in other forms, including film, television, videogame, graphic novel and comic book; class discussions will focus on development of a critical vocabulary suitable for analysing all of these. We will also examine science fiction fandom as a subculture and consider the role of fan activities in shaping science fiction's impact and status.
Instructors: W. Brock MacDonald and T.Moritz

For a complete listing of the 199Y1 Seminars offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science check out the web site at: http://www.artsandscience.utoronto.ca/ofr/timetable/winter/assem.html.

WDW FLC First Year Learning Community

FLC is a great way to meet classmates, develop friendships and get involved in campus life. The goal of the FLC program is to ensure a successful transition from high school to university by enhancing the student experience. 

WDW099Y LIFE SCIENCE

The Life Science First Year Learning Community (FLC) of 24 Woodsworth students share the same sections of BIO120H1F and BIO130H1S; MAT135H1F and MAT136H1S; CHM138H1F and CHM139H1S.  They also meet regularly as a group outside of class time for academic and social activities. FLC is a great way to meet classmates, develop friendships and get involved in campus life.

Life Science FLC meetings will be held on Thursday afternoons, for 90 minutes from 1:30-3:00 or 3:00-4:30 starting the first week of classes. In addition to sessions covering strategies for academic success, the previous FLCs won the annual pumpkin carving contest at Hallowe’en, competed in inter-College dodgeball, toured the Anatomy Museum and skated at City Hall.


RSM099Y ROTMAN COMMERCE

The Rotman Commerce First Year Learning Community (FLC) of 24 Woodsworth students share the same sections of required first year courses: RSM100Y, MAT133Y and ECO100Y. They also meet regularly as a group outside of class time on either Monday or Wednesday afternoons for social and developmental activities.

For more information about “FLCs” visit First Year Learning Community.

Woodsworth One

College One programs typically combine one or more theme-based courses with co-curricular events (e.g. guest lectures) and experiential learning opportunities. All first-year, full-time students in the Faculty of Arts and Science, regardless of college affiliation, are eligible for admission to these programs.

In Woodsworth One – Order and Disorder – students will explore issues and topics on law and order through seminars introducing perspectives from criminology, sociology, political science, philosophy, and history. In addition to the interdisciplinary seminars, the program includes a wide range of community-building activities, guest lectures, student leadership events, and special field trips. As much as possible, students will be enrolled in special Woodsworth One tutorial sections in their Arts & Science courses, unifying your entire First Year experience. Visit the Woodsworth One website.

 

199 Seminars

199 seminars are courses that focus on a discussion of issues, questions and controversies surrounding a particular discipline (or several disciplines) in a small-group setting that encourages the development of oral presentation skills, critical thinking, writing skills, and research methods. With a maximum enrolment of 24 students each, they are an ideal way to have an enjoyable and challenging small-class experience in their first year.  For a complete listing of the 199 Seminars offered by the Faculty of Arts and Science check the First Year Seminars

2013–14 199 Seminar Courses taught by Woodsworth instructors:

  • CCR199H1F Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours (L0331 Tu 1–3)
  • CCR199H1S Roll Over, Beethoven: Music, Media and the Marketplace (L0331 F 10–12)
  • CCR199Y1Y Fatal Attraction: The Lure of Villains (and now Vampires!) in Literature (L0331 Th 3–5)
  • SII199H1F Pacifists and Peaceniks: Canadian Peace Movements in Transnational Context (L0331 Th 10–12)
  • TBB199H1S Cultural Literacy in the Information Age (L0331 Tu 1–3)
  • XBC199Y1Y From Ray-Guns to Light Sabres: Science Fiction in Modern Culture (L0331 Th 1–3)

 

First Year Learning Communities (FLCs) 

FLCs provide first-year students with the opportunity to meet classmates, develop friendships, form study groups, and develop academic and personal skills. FLCs also introduce students to the resources, opportunities, culture, and benefit of the campus and its surrounding community. In 2013-14 we will have FLCs in Actuarial Science, Computer Science, Economics, International Relations, Life Sciences, Philosophy, Rotman Commerce

Life Science FLCs are limited to first-year students who are not living in a University residence. Students who choose to enroll in a FLC are placed in a group of 24 students from the same college, and will automatically be enrolled in the same sections of BIO120H1F and BIO130H1S; MAT135H1F and MAT136H1S; CHM138H1F and CHM139H1S. Each FLC is facilitated by an upper-year student mentor, under the guidance of staff from your college and a professor. For more information about “FLCs” visit First Year Learning Community.

CCR - Creative and Cultural Representations TBB - Thought, Belief and Behaviour SII - Society and Its Institutions XBC - Cross Breadth Category - Y course seminar that counts as half in each of two breadth categories


CCR 199H1F Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours  (L0331   T 1-3)
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s 1813 novel about spirited Elizabeth Bennett and forbidding Mr. Darcy, is the central focus of this seminar. Admired by both critics and readers since its publication, Pride and Prejudice rewards study both for its own sake, a model of English prose fiction and a revealing image of England on the threshold of modernity, and for what its contemporary popularity reveals about our time, which has witnessed an outpouring of retellings and adaptations of the novel since a highly successful 1995 BBC television production starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth. The seminar has two principal goals: to appreciate Austen’s fiction in historical context and to consider whether or not Austen’s original vision survives in contemporary versions of her story. Works studied will include Pride and Prejudice, a number of film and television versions of the novel, two other novels by Austen, and one or more modern novels and films based on Pride and Prejudice, including Bridget Jones’s Diary.
Instructor:  Dr. T. Moritz

CCR199H1S Roll Over, Beethoven: Music, Media, and the Marketplace  (L0331 F 10-12)
The invention of recording in the late 19th century caused profound changes in the world of music, changes so fundamental that we can easily overlook them today.  Before recording, listening to music was social, requiring the presence of other people playing and singing; now, in Robert Philips’ words, “most of the music we hear comes out of black boxes.”  How has technology affected the experience and meaning of music?  What other economic, social and ideological forces influence the modern musical marketplace and shape our tastes as listeners?  Readings in media and cultural theory, music criticism, and studies of the music industry will help us explore these questions from an interdisciplinary perspective; assignments will encourage students to reflect on their own experience of music as a cultural and social phenomenon.  Developing strong research, writing, and presentation skills is an important goal of the course.  No technical knowledge of music is required.
Instructor: W. Brock MacDonald

CCR 199Y1Y FATAL ATTRACTION: The Lure of the Villain in Literature  (L0332 Th 3-5)
Why is it that literary villains and vampires such as Satan, Iago, Heathcliff, Dexter, and Dracula get all the best lines?  Villains and vampires are usually intelligent, devious, scheming, and nefarious, often eloquent or even charismatic.  The defining characteristic of many of these characters is that they know they are villains and are often proud of it, yet as Tillyard comments “to be greatly bad, a man [or woman] must have correspondingly great potentialities for good.”  Villains and vampires are not only compelling as fictional characters, but their wrongdoings often begin and drive the plot.  In this course, we will examine some remarkable villains and vampires, including some female characters, selected from literature.  After identifying some archetypal characters and themes, students will observe how villains have been reshaped over the centuries and what role women play in the villainous impulse.  Films will be integrated with written texts where appropriate.  This seminar will assist students develop skills in critical reading and thinking, academic writing, and seminar presentations.  Evaluation will be based on reading response entries and a final analysis assignment, two in-class identification tests, one group presentation, and class participation.
Instructor:  J. B. Rose

SII 199H1F Pacifists and Peaceniks: Canadian Peace Movements in Transnational Context  (L0331   R 10-12)
“Millions of people take to the streets of major cities around the globe to protest the Iraq war.”  “More than 35 cities and towns across Canada hold rallies to stop the war in Afghanistan.”  These and other headlines confirm that public pressure for world peace continues to be an important social movement, but the recent protests are only the latest stage in the evolution of an organized rejection of violence and war.  This course examines major peace movements since the early twentieth century with a special focus on the Canadian experience.  After a review of the religious and philosophical basis of pacifism as well as the historical development of secular peace movements, students will study a number of peace movements, past and present, in terms of such issues as religious and ideological commitment, gender composition and popular culture.  The course, taught in an interactive seminar format, will assist students in developing skills in academic research and writing, presentations and class discussions.  Where appropriate, films will be integrated with a variety of interdisciplinary readings.  Evaluation will be based on in-class tests, presentations, a major research essay and class participation.
Instructor: Dr. T. Socknat

TBB 199H1S Cultural Literacy in the Information Age (L0331 Tu 10-12)
Today’s university students increasingly rely on the Internet for online databases of full-text academic articles, free downloads from Google Books, digitized reproductions of works of art, etc., even though professors routinely warn about using online sources.  This course will examine the role of the Internet in university study.  First, we will use critical thinking and critical writing to improve access to and evaluation of Internet content.  Second, we will compare the Internet’s impact with the earlier “cultural literacy” revolution.  In the 1980s, E.D. Hirsch, Jr., argued that educational institutions must provide a broad learning base to equip students to participate in their culture.  His 1987 Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know introduced a new type of research tool.  What type of cultural literacy is needed in today’s Information Age?
Instructor:  Dr. T. Moritz

XBC199Y1Y   From Ray-Guns to Light Sabres: Science Fiction in Modern Culture (L0331 Th 1-3)
This course examines science fiction as a literary genre, a sociocultural phenomenon, and a media industry, with attention to its key themes (for example, future history, artificial intelligence, the alien, and the hero), key works (including classic texts, such as Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy, and contemporary favourites, such as George Lucas's Star Wars films), and ongoing debates about its place in contemporary culture (Does science fiction have relevance for all of society because it addresses vital issues, or is it essentially escapist entertainment serving a niche audience?). The course will emphasize both prose science fiction and science fiction in other forms, including film, television, videogame, graphic novel and comic book; class discussions will focus on development of a critical vocabulary suitable for analysing all of these. We will also examine science fiction fandom as a subculture and consider the role of fan activities in shaping science fiction's impact and status.
Instructors: W. Brock MacDonald and T.Moritz

2014 Welcome Events
Each of these events will provide an introduction to student life on the St. George Campus at Woodsworth College and will feature a campus tour, information sessions and refreshments. Your parents are also welcome. Please go to this link for details of the events, and to reserve your place. Click on the button below and book early as space is limited.

 

 

Date Time Location
Saturday May 31 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. WW 111
Friday June 6 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. WW 111
Saturday June 14 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. WW 111


2014 Academic Orientation Sessions
These are more focused sessions held in the College during the summer to help you understand course selection and registration. To reserve your place at one of these sessions please click here:

 

 

Date Time Location
 Wednesday July 2  2:00 - 3:30  WW111
 Friday July 4  1:00 - 2:30  WW126
 Wednesday July 9  4:00 - 5:30  WW111
 Friday July 11  1:00 - 2:30  WW126
 Wednesday July 16  2:00 - 3:30  WW111
 Friday July 18  1:00 - 2:30  WW126
 Wednesday  July 23  4:00 - 5:30  WW126

 


Jump Start
Jump Start is an intensive day-long introduction to the secrets of success at University, featuring workshops and individual consultations with experts from the Woodsworth Academic Writing Centre and the University of Toronto Libraries, as well as presentations by experienced senior students. Register online at :


Date Time Location
 Saturday August 9  9:00 - 5:00  WW126
 Saturday August 16  9:00 - 5:00  WW126
 Saturday August 23  9:00 - 5:00  WW126

 

A Tutor will be available to provide Woodsworth students math assistance on the dates listed below.

Location: Room 215, Second Floor of the New Wing, 119 St. George Street

20131: January 8 - April 4
Mondays: 6:00 - 8:00 pm
Tuesdays & Thursdays: 2:00 - 4:00 pm

20129: September 17 - December 4
Mondays: 6:00 - 8:00 pm
Tuesdays & Thursdays: 2:00 - 4:00 pm

Note: The Department of Mathematics provides drop-in centres for all Arts & Science students.
For information please visit the Math website.

Note: During the summer session, only the Math Aid Centre in Sidney Smith Hall is in operation.